A Guide to Pet Insurance for Pre-existing Conditions • Benzinga


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Did you know that many of our readers end up choosing Lemonade pet insurance? for their pet insurance coverage?

Under the Affordable Care Act, health insurance providers can no longer deny coverage due to a pre-existing condition that you have when you purchase coverage. Unfortunately, this rule does not apply to our furry friends – pet insurance providers routinely deny coverage for animals with pre-existing conditions when they purchase coverage.

While it is more difficult to find pet insurance for pre-existing insurance, you still have a few options you can use to get your pet covered. Learn more about pet insurance for pre-existing conditions with Benzinga’s guide.

Key points

  • Pet insurance providers generally do not cover pre-existing conditions.
  • However, some insurers distinguish between curable and incurable pre-existing conditions, and you may be able to find coverage.
  • Your pet insurance provider will use exams, reviews of your pet’s medical records, and waiting periods to determine pre-existing conditions.
  • Even if your pet has an illness when you purchase a policy, you may be able to find insurance that only excludes the pre-existing condition.

What is a pre-existing condition for pet insurance?

A pre-existing condition for pet insurance depends on the insurance provider and the insurance policy. However, pre-existing conditions are any type of health problem or illness that your pet has developed before the waiting period has ended for your insurance policy to take effect. Any signs or symptoms that occur before coverage begins could potentially be denied coverage. .

Do pet insurance providers cover pre-existing conditions?

In general, no. Most pet insurance providers do not cover any type of pre-existing conditions. This is a common limitation among pet insurance policies.

Similar to auto insurance, the insurance provider wants to take as little risk as possible, and pre-existing conditions in a pet can be risky and costly.

Fortunately, there are a number of ways around this caveat in order to obtain insurance for your pet. Some insurers will distinguish between curable and incurable conditions to determine whether your pet’s pre-existing condition can be covered or not.

All insurers will have their own list of curable and incurable conditions eligible for coverage, so make sure your pet’s condition is reported to the insurer you choose before purchasing coverage.

Examples of curable pre-existing conditions

Some pet insurers may offer coverage for pre-existing conditions that they feel are curable. A condition is generally considered curable if it has no symptoms or comes back for some time after treatment.

Some conditions that are generally considered curable include:

  • Ear infections
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Respiratory infections
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Bladder infections

Examples of incurable pre-existing conditions

Pre-existing, incurable conditions are generally not covered under any circumstances. Pre-existing incurable conditions are those that require frequent vet visits, medication, and sometimes surgery to correct.

Here are some examples of incurable pre-existing conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Kidney disease
  • Heart disease
  • Urinary blockages
  • Diabetes
  • Allergies

What about hereditary and breed-specific conditions?

Hereditary and breed-specific conditions are considered inherited diseases and caused by a defect in certain genes passed down from a parent pet to its offspring. These conditions can affect any type of animal, including purebreds. These conditions can appear at birth or develop as the animal ages.

Hereditary and breed-specific conditions are generally covered by pet insurance policies. However, there are some limitations. As long as no symptoms or signs of illness appear before coverage begins, illness will be covered by most insurers.

It’s important to note that hereditary conditions can be both curable and incurable, so the same limitations of pre-existing conditions apply even if the insurance provider claims to cover hereditary or breed-specific conditions.

Some common hereditary or breed-specific conditions include:

  • Hip dysplasia
  • Elbow dysplasia
  • Patellar dislocation
  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD)
  • Cherry Eye (Entropion)

Why don’t pet insurers generally cover pre-existing conditions?

Pet insurance companies make money by taking as little risk as possible when issuing a policy. When you apply for coverage, your pet insurance provider goes through a special process called an underwriting to determine how likely they are to pay a claim for the animal you are insuring if they accept you.

If your pet already has a pre-existing condition when approved for coverage, the insurance provider will likely need to immediately incur an expense to treat your pet. This can quickly exceed the amount you pay in premiums, resulting in instant financial loss for the insurer.

Pet insurance providers make sure your pet does not have a pre-existing condition when you purchase coverage by requiring you to go through a waiting period before you can use your plan’s benefits.

During your waiting period, you cannot use your benefits to claim treatment reimbursements for any condition, as these symptoms are considered to be pre-existing in nature. This prevents pet owners from purchasing an insurance policy only to immediately use their benefits for a pre-existing condition.

How does a pet insurance provider determine what a pre-existing condition is?

Pet insurance companies often require a complete examination of your pet before insuring it. If the exam shows symptoms or comes back with a diagnosis for a condition considered to be pre-existing and incurable, the insurer will likely not cover that condition. If a pet insurance provider doesn’t require a review, they will perform a full review of your pet’s medical history before deciding whether or not to extend your coverage.

Even if there is no medical history examination or review required, do not lie to the insurance provider about pre-existing conditions or symptoms. Even if the condition is incurable, your pet insurance provider may allow you to purchase a policy that covers all other standard inclusions except the pre-existing condition. However, if your pet insurance provider determines that you’ve lied about your pet’s medical history, they’ll likely void your coverage entirely.

Is Pet Insurance Worth It If A Pet Has A Pre-existing Condition?

Even if your pet has a pre-existing condition, pet insurance can still offer a number of benefits, including:

  • Reduced veterinary care costs for other problems and conditions, excluding the pre-existing condition
  • Peace of mind knowing your pet can receive without worrying about covering the costs of treatments for their pre-existing condition
  • Encouragement to prevent the development of future health problems by providing coverage for routine visits (if you are purchasing a wellness plan)

The earlier you purchase pet insurance, the more likely your pet is to be covered. If you wait too long to choose a policy, your pet could develop symptoms of a pre-existing condition and the cost of insurance will increase dramatically. You may even be denied coverage if your pet is older when he develops this disease.

Compare pet insurance

Getting multiple pet insurance quotes is the first step in finding affordable coverage options. Consider getting a few quotes from the vendors recommended below first.

Find protection for your pet

While finding coverage for a pet with a pre-existing condition may be more difficult, it is by no means impossible. The key to finding affordable coverage is to start your insurance search as early as possible.

Start by collecting multiple quotes from competing insurance providers to get an idea of ​​what you might expect to pay for pet insurance.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a bilateral pet insurance exclusion?

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What is a bilateral pet insurance exclusion?

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Sarah horvath

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Bilateral illnesses or injuries are conditions that affect both sides of your pet’s body. Hip dysplasia is an example of a bilateral condition. A two-sided exclusion is part of the pet insurance policy which states that if there was illness or injury on one side of the body before coverage, if it develops on the other side, it does not. will not be covered.

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Benzinga

What happens if I lie about my pet’s pre-existing condition?

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What happens if I lie about my pet’s pre-existing condition?

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Sarah horvath

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Lying to an insurance provider about your pet’s pre-existing condition is considered fraud and you could be subject to a policy void. Since insurance fraud is against the law, you could also be subject to fines and even jail.

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answered

Benzinga

How Do Pet Insurance Companies Know About Pre-existing Conditions?

1

How Do Pet Insurance Companies Know About Pre-existing Conditions?

request

Sarah horvath

1

Pet insurance companies will do an exam or review your pet’s medical history to determine if there are any pre-existing conditions.

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answered

Benzinga

Benzinga has developed a specific methodology for classifying pet insurance. To see a full breakdown of our methodology, please visit our Pet Insurance Methodology page.

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